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Suggested Itineraries

Suggested Itineraries

The Ulster Way is the perfect challenge for those looking to do something different for either personal achievement or a charity fundraiser. The trail, which is made up of a series of long-distance off-road sections plus on road sections which can be explored clockwise, anticlockwise or in a random order of your choosing. It should be noted that the following suggestions are divided between waymarked routes and non waymarked routes. We would advise that on the non waymarked routes, which follow mainly public roads, you take public transport.

 

1 Day Walks

Florence Court to Belcoo

This one-day walking route explores for experienced walkers, while lower down an easier alternative explores the historic Florence Court estate, the internationally famous Marble Arch Caves and the verdant gorge of the Cladagh River.

Distance: 10 miles (16km) | Route Description

Belcoo to Belleek including Lough Navar Forest Option

This two-day walking route explores the uplands of west Fermanagh comprising through some of the most remote corners of the region. It also affords the option of taking in the celebrated views from the Cliffs of Magho by walking an additional loop through Lough Navar Forest.

Distance: 12 miles (19km) | Route Description

Moneyneany to Dungiven

This section travels through forest and across open hillside and offers some fantastic views. Great views of the Roe Valley and the historic town of Dungiven can be enjoyed.

Distance: 13 miles (21km) | Route Description

Lagan Towpath

The Lagan Towpath takes the walker along the river and canal system through a variety of wetland, riverside meadows and mixed woodland from Belfast to Lisburn. Home to a variety of wildlife, the canal system dates back to the late 18th century and many features still give an insight into the majestic era of the lighter – the name for the boats that originally travelled on the Lagan Canal.
Distance: 11 miles (18km) | Route Description

North Down Coastal Path

North Down Coastal Path extends from Holywood in the west to Orlock in the east. The path passes through coastline and parkland. Historic relics and flora and fauna are found in abundance, including the grey seals which can be spotted offshore.

Distance: 15.4 miles (25km) | Route Description

 

2 Day Walks

Mourne Way

A challenging yet rewards two-day walk from the coast, across the edge of the Mourne Mountains and back to the sea at the opposite side of the range. This route crosses open hill side with no waymarking so walkers should be adequately prepared.

Distance: 26 miles (42km) | Route Description

 

Newry Canal Way

An enjoyable one-day flat walking route alongside the Newry Canal taking in pretty villages, an abundance of wildlife and lock gates that link you to the history of the area.

Distance: 17.5 miles (28km) | Route Description

 

Gortin to Moneyneany

The Sperrin Mountains form the largest area of upland in Northern Ireland. This 21-mile section of the Ulster Way journeys through the heart of the range, mainly following quiet roads and tracks. The highlight is the middle portion through the exceptionally scenic Glenelly Valley. From the head of the valley, walkers who wish to shorten the final road section to Moneyneany can use the public bus service along the B47.

Distance: 23miles (37km) | Route Description

 

Moyle Way

Taking the walker through a magnificent land of geology, wildlife, history and folklore, this route passes a wealth of rivers, ancient monuments and exposed hill summits before reaching its end in the beautiful Glenariff Forest Park.

Distance: 26 miles (42km) | Route Description

 

Glenarm to Ballynure incorporating Antrim Hills Way

The Antrim Hills Way cuts a scenic route through the Antrim Coast and Glens Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It explores a high coastal plateau and encompasses some of the most enjoyable upland walking in County Antrim. Dramatic scenery, isolated hills and fantastic history are just some of the treats on offer.

Distance: 20 miles (32km) | Route Description

 

3 Day Walks

Lecale Way

A two-day walking route that takes in the pretty villages, wild coastline, and historic sites of the Lecale Region. This section of trail uses a combination of country roads, tracks and footpaths to explore the best of the scenery, with lowland terrain and frequent signposts.

Distance: 34 miles (55km) | Route Description

 

Ring of Gullion Way

A two-day walking route following a mixture of footpaths and country lanes past a number of historical sites in Sleeve Gullion, an area that has long been celebrated by geologists for its unique natural history.

Distance: 37 miles (59km) | Route Description

 

Lough Bradan to Gortin

This section boasts some of the most extensive views on the entire Ulster Way as it journeys from the westernmost reaches of County Tyrone into the foothills of the Sperrin Mountains. At 34 miles it will be too long for most walkers to contemplate tackling in a single day, but it can be broken down into several more manageable stages, each with its own individual character and scenery.

Distance: 34 miles (55km) | Route Description

 

Dungiven to Castlerock inc. North Sperrins Way

From the main spine of the Sperrin Mountains a broad ridge of rolling upland stretches north all the way to the north coast. The North Sperrins Way makes up the majority of this route following the crest of this ridge from the historic town of Dungiven all the way to Swans’s Bridge near Binevenagh. The Ulster Way section then continues further to Castlerock on the north coast. Along the way the route enjoys fine views and a variety of walking, from open mountainside to forest trails and quiet roads.

Distance: 39 miles (63km) | Route Description

 

Causeway Coast Way

This route, from Portstewart to Ballycastle, passes through the Causeway Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, a World Heritage Site and several Areas of Special Scientific Interest. It includes views of wide bays, sandy beaches, dramatic cliffs and off-shore rocks.

Distance: 32 miles / 51km| Route Description

 

Week Long Walks

Sliabh Beagh Way

A two-day walking route that meanders along a mixture of country lanes and forest racks through countryside stepped in local myth and legend. This trail is well signposted and follows a remote path and generally good terrain across the expanse of the moor around Sliabh Beagh.

Distance: 40 miles (65km) | Route Description

 

Walking the Full Route

Lecale Way

A two-day walking route that takes in the pretty villages, wild coastline, and historic sites of the Lecale Region. This section of trail uses a combination of country roads, tracks and footpaths to explore the best of the scenery, with lowland terrain and frequent signposts.

Distance: 34 miles (55km) | Route Description

 

Mourne Way

A challenging yet rewards two-day walk from the coast, across the edge of the Mourne Mountains and back to the sea at the opposite side of the range. This route crosses open hill side with no waymarking so walkers should be adequately prepared.

Distance: 26 miles (42km) | Route Description

 

Rostrevor to Newry

This section is not waymarked and mainly on public roads some of which can be very busy. Walkers are actively encouraged to make use of public transport along this section so they can make best use of their time on the more attractive waymarked sections.

This follows a busy main road along the northern shore of Carlingford Lough before joining an off-road path to the centre of Newry

Distance: 10 miles (16km) | Route Description

 

Ring of Gullion Way

A two-day walking route following a mixture of footpaths and country lanes past a number of historical sites in Sleeve Gullion, an area that has long been celebrated by geologists for its unique natural history.

Distance: 37 miles (59km) | Route Description

 

Newry Canal Way

An enjoyable one-day flat walking route alongside the Newry Canal taking in pretty villages, an abundance of wildlife and lock gates that link you to the history of the area.

Distance: 17.5 miles (28km) | Route Description

 

Scarva to Aughnacloy

This section is not waymarked and mainly on public roads some of which can be very busy. Walkers are actively encouraged to make use of public transport along this section so they can make best use of their time on the more attractive waymarked sections.

Connecting the Newry Canal Way to the Sliabh Beagh Way, this section of the route follows an intricate series of rural roads taking in Tandragee, Clare Glens, Armagh, Killyleagh and Caledon.

Distance: 38 miles (61km) | Route Description

 

Sliabh Beagh Way

A two-day walking route that meanders along a mixture of country lanes and forest racks through countryside stepped in local myth and legend. This trail is well signposted and follows a remote path and generally good terrain across the expanse of the moor around Sliabh Beagh.

Distance: 40 miles (65km) | Route Description

 

Lisnaskea to Florence Court

This section is not waymarked and mainly on public roads some of which can be very busy. Walkers are actively encouraged to make use of public transport along this section so they can make best use of their time on the more attractive waymarked sections.

This section of the Ulster Way is on mainly quiet rural roads taking in the villages of Derrylin and Kinawley. There are short sections along busier roads: the section between Lisnaskea and Derrylin is particularly busy with lorries due to the heavy industry in the area.

Distance: 22 miles (35km) | Route Description

Florence Court to Belcoo

This one-day walking route explores for experienced walkers, while lower down an easier alternative explores the historic Florence Court estate, the internationally famous Marble Arch Caves and the verdant gorge of the Cladagh River.

Distance: 10 miles (16km) | Route Description

 

Belcoo to Belleek including Lough Navar Forest Option

This two-day walking route explores the uplands of west Fermanagh comprising through some of the most remote corners of the region. It also affords the option of taking in the celebrated views from the Cliffs of Magho by walking an additional loop through Lough Navar Forest.

Distance: 12 miles (19km) | Route Description

 

Belleek to Lough Bradan

This section is not waymarked and mainly on public roads some of which can be very busy. Walkers are actively encouraged to make use of public transport along this section so they can make best use of their time on the more attractive waymarked sections.

This section follows rural roads and short sections of forest track through north Fermanagh and passing briefly through south Donegal.

Distance: 31 miles (50km) | Route Description

 

Lough Bradan to Gortin

This section boasts some of the most extensive views on the entire Ulster Way as it journeys from the westernmost reaches of County Tyrone into the foothills of the Sperrin Mountains. At 34 miles it will be too long for most walkers to contemplate tackling in a single day, but it can be broken down into several more manageable stages, each with its own individual character and scenery.

Distance: 34 miles (55km) | Route Description

 

Gortin to Moneyneany

The Sperrin Mountains form the largest area of upland in Northern Ireland. This 21-mile section of the Ulster Way journeys through the heart of the range, mainly following quiet roads and tracks. The highlight is the middle portion through the exceptionally scenic Glenelly Valley. From the head of the valley, walkers who wish to shorten the final road section to Moneyneany can use the public bus service along the B47.

Distance: 23miles (37km) | Route Description

 

Moneyneany to Dungiven

This section travels through forest and across open hillside and offers some fantastic views. Great views of the Roe Valley and the historic town of Dungiven can be enjoyed.

Distance: 13 miles (21km) | Route Description

 

Dungiven to Castlerock inc. North Sperrins Way

From the main spine of the Sperrin Mountains a broad ridge of rolling upland stretches north all the way to the north coast. The North Sperrins Way makes up the majority of this route following the crest of this ridge from the historic town of Dungiven all the way to Swans’s Bridge near Binevenagh. The Ulster Way section then continues further to Castlerock on the north coast. Along the way the route enjoys fine views and a variety of walking, from open mountainside to forest trails and quiet roads.

Distance: 39 miles (63km) | Route Description

 

Magilligan to Binevenagh

This section is not waymarked and mainly on public roads some of which can be very busy. Walkers are actively encouraged to make use of public transport along this section so they can make best use of their time on the more attractive waymarked sections.

This section of the route connects the Inishowen peninsula to the wider circular part of the trail, incorporating the North Sperrins Way. There are no transport connections on this section of the trail.

Distance: 10 miles (16km) Route Description

 

Castlerock to Portstewart

This section is not waymarked and mainly on public roads some of which can be very busy. Walkers are actively encouraged to make use of public transport along this section so they can make best use of their time on the more attractive waymarked sections.

This section is on mainly quiet rural roads between Castlerock and Coleraine. The section from Coleraine to Portstewart follows the busy A2 road.

Distance: 10 miles (16km) Route Description

 

Causeway Coast Way

This route, from Portstewart to Ballycastle, passes through the Causeway Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, a World Heritage Site and several Areas of Special Scientific Interest. It includes views of wide bays, sandy beaches, dramatic cliffs and off-shore rocks.

Distance: 32 miles / 51km| Route Description

 

Ballycastle to Glenarm

This section is not waymarked and mainly on public roads some of which can be very busy. Walkers are actively encouraged to make use of public transport along this section so they can make best use of their time on the more attractive waymarked sections.

This section offers a poor weather alternative to the Moyle Way, following rural roads along the east coast through the villages of Cushendun and Cushendall. The Moyle Way can become very soft under foot after a period of rain.

Distance: 32.5 miles / 52km| Route Description

 

Moyle Way

Taking the walker through a magnificent land of geology, wildlife, history and folklore, this route passes a wealth of rivers, ancient monuments and exposed hill summits before reaching its end in the beautiful Glenariff Forest Park.

Distance: 26 miles (42km) | Route Description

 

Glenarm to Ballynure incorporating Antrim Hills Way

The Antrim Hills Way cuts a scenic route through the Antrim Coast and Glens Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It explores a high coastal plateau and encompasses some of the most enjoyable upland walking in County Antrim. Dramatic scenery, isolated hills and fantastic history are just some of the treats on offer.

Distance: 20 miles (32km) | Route Description

 

Ballynure to Belfast

This section is not waymarked and mainly on public roads some of which can be very busy. Walkers are actively encouraged to make use of public transport along this section so they can make best use of their time on the more attractive waymarked sections.

The route between Ballynure and Whiteabbey is on a combination of quiet rural roads and forest tracks through Woodburn Forest. The route is not signposted on the ground.

Distance: 19 miles (30km) | Route Description

 

Lagan Towpath

The Lagan Towpath takes the walker along the river and canal system through a variety of wetland, riverside meadows and mixed woodland from Belfast to Lisburn. Home to a variety of wildlife, the canal system dates back to the late 18th century and many features still give an insight into the majestic era of the lighter – the name for the boats that originally travelled on the Lagan Canal.

Distance: 11 miles (18km) | Route Description

 

North Down Coastal Path

North Down Coastal Path extends from Holywood in the west to Orlock in the east. The path passes through coastline and parkland. Historic relics and flora and fauna are found in abundance, including the grey seals which can be spotted offshore.

Distance: 15.4 miles (25km) | Route Description

 

Groomsport to Strangford

This section is not waymarked and mainly on public roads some of which can be very busy. Walkers are actively encouraged to make use of public transport along this section so they can make best use of their time on the more attractive waymarked sections.

The Groomsport to Strangford section of trail follows the eastern coast along the Ards Peninsula, before cutting across to Portaferry on the shores of Strangford Lough. There is a regular ferry service between Portaferry and Strangford. The route mainly follows the busy A2 coast road, with intermittent sections on quiet rural roads and coastal paths. There are also some opportunities to walk along beaches.

Distance: 30 miles (49km) | Route Description